Monday , November 30 2020

"The Largest Parking on Mars"




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The Concept of the Artist. InSight Landing, Elysium Planitia.Credit: NASA / JPL-Caltec

Just blah.

This is a reasonable description of the inconspicuous destination of the InSight spacecraft, now hours away from touchdown on Mars,

"The largest parking lot on Mars," says NASA.

"Smooth and flat," says Matt Golombeck of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California.

Indeed, Elysium Planitia – the place of landing slightly north of the Martian equator – is monotonous, not mountainous; a sandy plain that is hopelessly clear.

"A place that does not have big rocks or big craters," says Golombeck. – Not very steep slopes, not many rocks.

Exactly what NASA wants.

"Although I will never call it boring," adds Golombeck, the geologist who runs the Mission Landing Team. "It's boring in the eyes of the observer."

Particularly when it gets deeper: Once deployed, InSight plans to collapse five meters – about 16 feet – under the grim landscape.

Immerse yourself far or inward, and NASA can understand the underground secrets of Mars.

Image of the landing site taken from the orbit of Mars Odysseus.Credit: NASA / JPL-Caltech / ASU

InSight's landing location, 373 miles from the Covenant of Curiosity.Credit: NASA / JPL-Caltec

For almost any vehicle, a flat base is reliable under. Obstacles are dangerous.

The land of a great rock and InSight tends to break through; they arrive on a steep slope and can tilt or turn. Stay on the surface that can not handle the load – some Martian dust is "extremely fluffy," says Golombeck, and the spacecraft "can effectively disappear."

That's why the touchdown workplace, dull or not. None of the above scenarios are likely there. & Nbsp;"This is the best place we can find, "he says.

NASA's site search took about three and a half years. Using Mars orbiters, scientists depict Elysium Planitia systematically and comprehensively; 150 high-resolution images turned out to be irreplaceable.

"We have extremely detailed information,"Says Golombeck. & Nbsp;"We measured the slopes. The crater distribution. The Shadows of the Rocks. You do not bet on a landing.

Insight team now – with reasonable confidence – can identify almost everything in the area, which is approximately a meter away.

"It's like the size of your desk," says Golombeck.

However, Elysium Planitia does not offer any guarantees.

"Once we land," he says, "then we'll know how well we've done it.

Simulation: InSight touches down.Credit: NASA / JPL-Caltec

Unlike Mars Roads, InSight is not walking around. Instead, the probe remains stuck.

The mission, literally innovative, embodies the mysterious Martian interior; two instruments of the spacecraft will go deeper into Mars.

A seismometer, located in a volleyball field, will find landslides, dust storms, meteor shocks and Marsh.

A self-confident mechanical motor coupled with temperature sensors will detect how much heat goes out of the planet& # 39; s& Nbsp; interior.

Now the hard part.

For Insight, rocks below the surface are just as difficult as the rocks above.

Take the mole. Good for tunneling through Martian soil. Good for small rocks at four to five centimeters (the mall just pushes them out of the way). It's not so good with something much bigger, though sometimes the mole may manage to maneuver through it.

But there is a limit. "He can not go through a hard, untouched rock," says Golombeck. If the mall directly collides with a big flat, it stops.

It's just so scarythe mole has only one shot at the point of entry without doing it.

"It's one time and that's it," he says.

However, NASA says the 16 foot drop – or more – is possible.

"That's a pretty good chance," Golombeck predicted.

"But you never know for sure.

The Concept of the Artist. InSight will explore the inner structure of Mars – its bark, mantle and core.Credit: NASA / JPL-Caltec

If InSight decodes the inside of Mars, scientists can extract the early history of Mars. They can understand how many rocky planets have been formed and evolved for billions of years. Clues about how life flames in a world or disappears – will appear.

These clues have long been lost on Earth – a geologically dynamic place that wipes out most of its past. But Mars remains much the way it was centuries ago.

"It's all over in geology," says Golombeck.

Expand and ultimately we can understand the birth of the Earth. Nothing about it.

"On a mission"- the new Marathon InSight Journey Series, presented by NASA's Jet Propulsion Engine –is here,

Artist Impression. InSight landing on Mars surface.Credit: NASA / GAS

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The Concept of the Artist. InSight Landing, Elysium Planitia.Credit: NASA / JPL-Caltec

Just blah.

This is a reasonable description of the inconspicuous destination of the InSight spacecraft, which is now far from Mars touchdown.

"The largest parking lot on Mars," says NASA.

"Smooth and flat," says Matt Golombeck of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California.

Indeed, Elysium Planitia – the place of landing slightly north of the Martian equator – is monotonous, not mountainous; a sandy plain that is hopelessly clear.

"A place that does not have big rocks or big craters," says Golombeck. – Not very steep slopes, not many rocks.

Exactly what NASA wants.

"Although I will never call it boring," adds Golombeck, the geologist who runs the Mission Landing Team. "It's boring in the eyes of the observer."

Especially when it gets deeper: Once deployed, InSight plans to drop five meters – about 16 feet – under the gloomy landscape.

Immerse yourself far or inward, and NASA can understand the underground secrets of Mars.

Image of the landing site taken from the orbit of Mars Odysseus.Credit: NASA / JPL-Caltech / ASU

InSight's landing location, 373 miles from the Covenant of Curiosity.Credit: NASA / JPL-Caltec

For almost any vehicle, a flat base is reliable under. Obstacles are dangerous.

The land of a great rock and InSight tends to break through; they arrive on a steep slope and can tilt or turn. Stay on the surface that can not handle the load – some Martian dust is "extremely fluffy," says Golombeck, and the spacecraft "can effectively disappear."

That's why the touchdown workplace, dull or not. None of the above scenarios are likely there. "This is the best place we can find, "he says.

NASA's site search took about three and a half years. Using Mars orbiters, scientists depict Elysium Planitia systematically and comprehensively; 150 high-resolution images turned out to be irreplaceable.

"We have extremely detailed information,"Says Golombeck, "We measured the slopes. The crater distribution. The Shadows of the Rocks. You do not bet on a landing.

Insight team now – with reasonable confidence – can identify almost everything in the area, which is approximately a meter away.

"It's like the size of your desk," says Golombeck.

However, Elysium Planitia does not offer any guarantees.

"Once we land," he says, "then we'll know how well we've done it.

Simulation: InSight touches down.Credit: NASA / JPL-Caltec

Unlike Mars Roads, InSight is not walking around. Instead, the probe remains stuck.

The mission, literally innovative, embodies the mysterious Martian interior; two instruments of the spacecraft will go deeper into Mars.

A seismometer, located in a volleyball field, will find landslides, dust storms, meteor shocks and Marsh.

A self-confident mechanical motor coupled with temperature sensors will detect how much heat goes out of the planet& # 39; s interior.

Now the hard part.

For Insight, rocks below the surface are just as difficult as the rocks above.

Take the mole. Good for tunneling through Martian soil. Good for small rocks at four to five centimeters (the mall just pushes them out of the way). It's not so good with something much bigger, though sometimes the mole may manage to maneuver through it.

But there is a limit. "He can not go through a hard, untouched rock," says Golombeck. If the mall directly collides with a big flat, it stops.

It's just so scarythe mole has only one shot at the point of entry without doing it.

"It's one time and that's it," he says.

However, NASA says the 16 foot drop – or more – is possible.

"That's a pretty good chance," Golombeck predicted.

"But you never know for sure.

The Concept of the Artist. InSight will explore the inner structure of Mars – its bark, mantle and core.Credit: NASA / JPL-Caltec

If InSight decodes the inside of Mars, scientists can extract the early history of Mars. They can understand how many rocky planets have been formed and evolved for billions of years. Clues about how life flames in a world or disappears – will appear.

These clues have long been lost on Earth – a geologically dynamic place that wipes out most of its past. But Mars remains much the way it was centuries ago.

"It's all over in geology," says Golombeck.

Expand and ultimately we can understand the birth of the Earth. Nothing about it.

"On a mission"- the new series of InSight Mars Travel Podcasts, presented by NASA's Jet Propulsion Engine – is here.

Artist Impression. InSight landing on Mars surface.Credit: NASA / GAS


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