Friday , January 21 2022

An astrophotographer spotted a piece of ice orbiting comet 67P in Rosetta's photos



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The European Space Agency (ESA) Rosetta mission spent two years in Comet 67P / Churyumov-Gerasimenko. At the end of September 2016, his mission was terminated when the spacecraft was sent into a comet collision. During the 67P comet, she captured a huge amount of images.

ESA made all of these images freely available on their Rosetta website, and now an astrophotographer working with these images has found something interesting: short ice traveling through space with 67P.

The amateur astronomer who made the dive is Jackint Roger of Spain. (Roger's work is pretty cool. Look at this.)

Roger created a GIF of a series of processed images of Rosetta and the gif gave the 67P an icy satellite in focus.

The Jacet Roger Image Gift from Rosetta revealed the small comet moon of comet 67P, now called "Churymoon" after the full name of 67P: comet 67P Churyumov-Gerasimenko.

The images in the gif are a few months after the perihelion, which was in August 2015. At that moment, the 67P was visible in the full sunlight. The heat of the sun releases gases from the comet into space and dust is carried along with the gases. As a result, the comet was in huge dust.

The Rosetta OSIRIS science camera shows the sudden onset of a well-defined jet-like feature coming out of the comet's neck in the Anuket region. Image Credit: ESA / Rosetta / OSIRIS

But the 67P's near encounter with the sun did not only release dust: the small ice chunk was also expelled from the comet during perihelion.

The GIF is of images that focus on the comet's nucleus, resulting in a tiny ice body. The small piece, which is probably less than 4 meters in diameter, is now called "Churymoon" thanks to Julia Marin-Jasselli de la Parara, who introduced the term. She is an ESA researcher who worked on Rosetta's mission and is now receiving her PhD in Commerce.

Comet 67P / Churyumov-Gerasimenko is a comet from the Jupiter family. His 6.5-year voyage around the Sun takes him beyond Jupiter's orbit to the farthest part, to the orbits of Earth and Mars in his closest. Credit: ESA with labels from the author
Comet 67P / Churyumov-Gerasimenko is a comet from the Jupiter family. His 6.5-year voyage around the Sun takes him beyond Jupiter's orbit to the farthest part, to the orbits of Earth and Mars in his closest. Credit: ESA with labels from the author

The images used by Jackint Roger are from Rosetta's OSIRIS tool. OSIRIS had two cameras, a wide-angle camera (WAC) designed to map gas and dust near the comet, and a narrow-angle camera (NAC) designed to map the core of the high-resolution comet. The GIF is composed of NAC images. When these photos were taken, Rosetta was more than 400 km (250 miles) from the center of the comet.

Now that little Churymoon has been spotted, scientists from the Rosetta and OSIRIS teams are studying it more closely.

According to their work, Churymoon spent its first 12 hours after the comet came down the orbital path at about 67P at a distance of 2.4 to 3.9 km (1.5 and 2.4 miles) from the center of the comet. Then he went through a coma. The brightness of the coma made it difficult to see Churymoon.

Further observation saw the tiny body emerge from the other side of the comet's coma. These observations were in line with the first and confirmed the path of the small piece around the comet, at least until October 23, 2015.

Part of Rosetta's mission for Comet 67P was to track and study debris thrown from the comet. This tiny Churymoon is probably the largest piece of waste to date. This will be the subject of further study by scientists.

Another gif of comet 67P Churyumov-Gerasimenko from Spanish astrophotographer Jacinto Roger.

Rosetta's mission was to watch the comet as it passed through the perihelion. It took ten years to travel to 67P / G-C. His surprising discoveries greatly expanded our knowledge of comets. Prior to Rosetta, comets were considered dirty lumps of ice to be carried around in space. Rosetta revealed the complexity of her goal and, in general, the complexity of comets as a whole.

<img src = "https://www.universetoday.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/ESA_Rosetta_Primordial_comet_infographic_1280-1024×640.jpg" alt = " Thanks to the Rosetta mission, we know that comets can be much more interesting and geologically complex than we thought. Image Credit: Center: ESA / Rosetta / NavCam – CC BY-SA IGO 3.0; Insertions: ESA / Rosetta / MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS / UPD / LAM / IAA / SSO / INTA / UPM / DASP / IDA; Fornasier et al. (2015); ESA / Rosetta / MPS for COSIMA Team MPS / CSNSM / UNIBW / TUORLA / IWF / IAS / ESA / BUW / MPE / LPC2E / LCM / FMI / UTU / LISA / UOFC / vH & S; Langevin et al. (2016) "class =" wp-image-143174 "srcset =" https://www.universetoday.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/ESA_Rosetta_Primordial_comet_infographic_1280-1024×640.jpg 1024w, https: //www.universetoday .com / wp-content / uploads / 2019/08 / ESA_Rosetta_Primordial_comet_infographic_1280-250×156.jpg 250w, https://www.universetoday.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/ESA_Rosetta_Primordial_comet_infographic_1280ps5 / 580x580x580x580x580x580x580x580x580x580x580x580x580x580x580x580x5805 /www.universetoday.com/ wp-content / uploads / 2019/08 / ESA_Rosetta_Primordial_comet_infographic_1280-768×480.jpg 768W, https://www.universetoday.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/ESA_Rosetta_Primordial_comet_infographic_1280.jpg = 1280w "max-width (max-width) 767px) 89vw, (max-width: 1000px) 54vw, (max-width: 1071px) 543px, 580px "/>
Thanks to the Rosetta mission, we know that comets can be much more interesting and geologically complex than we thought. Image Credit: Center: ESA / Rosetta / NavCam – CC BY-SA IGO 3.0; Insertions: ESA / Rosetta / MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS / UPD / LAM / IAA / SSO / INTA / UPM / DASP / IDA; Fornasier et al. (2015); ESA / Rosetta / MPS for COSIMA Team MPS / CSNSM / UNIBW / TUORLA / IWF / IAS / ESA / BUW / MPE / LPC2E / LCM / FMI / UTU / LISA / UOFC / vH & S; Langevin et al. (2016)

Instead of static bodies, scientists now know more about their geological complexity. Perhaps the most surprising result is that the 67P is probably the result of a collision between two comets. According to Eberhard Grunn, an interdisciplinary scientist working on the Rosetta mission, comets such as 67P / G-C are "geologically complex worlds in which innumerable processes work, creating the incredible surface structure and activity of the comet."

With this new discovery, Rosetta's complexity is even more intriguing.

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