Sunday , June 13 2021

Braid: The rule of law shakes when the Liberals are elected in Quebec



Jody Wilson-Reabul, Justice Minister and Prosecutor General of Canada, made a statement on the Ottawa Parliamentary Hill on Thursday, October 18, 2018. textbooks – is becoming a central point of debate in brewing political controversy over the question whether the prime minister's assistants put undue pressure on the former Advocate General. THE CANADIAN PRESS / Sean Kilpatrick ORG XMIT: CPT123

Prime Minister Justin Trudo often trumps with his devotion to the rule of law.

Now the scandal with SNC-Lavalin suggests that the liberals will repeal the law when it is convenient.

This federal trend, of course, is regionally selective.

When the courts closed the Trans-mountain pipeline last August, the liberals bravely took the decision on their chin.

They bowed deeply to the rule of law and began more consultations. And that was it.

But when a giant Quebec company is facing prosecution on charges of corruption, the liberals, including the prime minister himself, are phoning.

The allegation is that former Justice Minister and Attorney General Jody Wilson-Reybula has been pressured by the Prime Minister's Cabinet to reject prosecution plans in favor of a negotiated settlement without a trial.

After the globe and the mail destroyed the story last week, it stunned for a few days and then broke out on Tuesday, when Wilson-Reabel suddenly left the cabinet.

On Monday, Trudo said the fact that she is still in his office as a Veteran Veteran shows that there is no problem.

"Her presence in the office should actually talk about herself," he said.

Now, as well as her absence.

Once she left, Trudo sharply criticized her former minister, saying she was surprised and disappointed to have left.

If he felt something was wrong, he had to tell him personally last fall, he said repeatedly.

Two things about it.

Wilson-Reibold has not said publicly about pressure claims. This was reported by Globe on the basis of sources.

And Trudo himself, while equalizing his former minister, did not explicitly deny that he had been pressured.

The treatment was so difficult that you have to wonder if the prime minister is beginning to worry about the solidarity of the cabinet. Treasury President Jane Filpot surprisingly praises Wilson-Reebord.

Of course, economic and political stakes are huge. SNC-Lavalin is doing a huge business abroad and across Canada. She has contracts with the government of Alberta, including a large hospital at the foot.

Quebec media and leaders stand firm behind Lavalin, as they do Bombardier, despite the risky smell the two companies often emit. Every attack on them is an offense to the province.

This is Quebec. There are federal elections to come. Are we really imagining that nothing will happen when Lavalin could be in the criminal court?

This model is so predictable that I hope the liberals will try to make some complicated behavior to move the Trans Mountain. At least we know they care.

Wilson-Rajwood is B. First-born woman and a high-performance attorney, but a little profound knowledge of Ottawa. For a beginner like her, the sacrificial face for a plant on the reality of Canada was probably inevitable.

But it may not be over. Wilson-Rawdle has committed a former judge to the Supreme Court to advise her on what he can say publicly.

The silence that is required by the privilege of a lawyer-client may not relate to some aspects of her conversations about SNC-Lavalin.

(For many, puzzled by these complexities, as a lawyer-general and a justice minister, she was a lawyer, and the government was a client.)

Lissa Silver, professor of law, an expert on these issues, outlines the duty of a minister in this position, which shows inadequate pressure from the political side.

"The Minister's role is to say," you can not call me and say that – and in fact, no, I will not even talk to you about it. "

"And if there is really a lot of pressure, you have to get out of it – say," I'm in conflict, my role as Minister of Justice and Advocate-General is compromised and I am there. ""

Now Wilson-Reebld is really there – maybe a little late, but potentially dangerous for the liberals because he obviously wants to talk.

Don Braid's column appears regularly at the Herald

[email protected]

Twitter: @DonBraid

Don's policy. T


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