Sunday , December 6 2020

The "Book of Questions," by Pablo Neruda, is published in the illustrated edition of Noticias Ultima Hora de Guatemala



One year after the death of Pablo Neruda in 1973, it was published Book of Questions, one of the "most crazy" poems of the Chilean Nobel Prize, in which he asks about his life and the world, and which is currently being re-published in a specially illustrated collection.

"Who can I ask what I have done in this world Why do I move without wanting why I can not be immobile Why did I roll without wheels I was flying without wings or feathers And what if my bones lived in Chile? "Neruda (1904-1973), the poet, born and dead in Chile, lived in countries like Spain, France or Mexico.

The volume now published by Seix Barral unifies a collection of poems that the 1978 Nobel Prize for Literature builds with an expressive resource, the constant question that makes the book of poems work with "very ludicrous and free tone."

"This is a very original poetry book and really a holiday, and it is very characteristic of Neruda in the sense that the images, metaphors and colors that appear in the verses are very recognizable as Neruda's imagination," says Teresa Bailah, editor of Seakes Barral, who for years has restored the work of an author.

Although it combines elements of the poet's work, Book of Questions is "very different" to this game of building all the poems based on questions that are sometimes as crazy as when he asks, "Why do the trees hide the grandeur of their roots?" or "Why Christopher Columbus Could Not Find Spain?" he said.

This posthumous work, whose original publication was published in 1974, is now illustrated by Maria Guitart (Barcelona, ​​1978), which not only "dialogues" with the essence of poetry of the Chilean poet, but also describes it.

In 74 chapters, Neruda raises questions about life, dreams, death, history, sea, animals, rivers, seasons, heavens, stars, or heroes such as Baudelaire, Jose Marty, Paul Elluar or Petcar.

* EFE

Priscilla Leon Lopez


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