Tuesday , July 27 2021

Arranged the first XV rugby teams contribute to the reduction of participation



The first-person rugby managers in the management lead to a reduction in the number of players in New Zealand.

New Zealand Rugby (NZR) announced on Tuesday the completion of an independent review of the New Zealand rugby high school.

The outcome of the report, which can be read entirely here, was endorsed by the NZR board at its December meeting and the implementation of the 31 recommendations of the report will begin this month.

The review, commissioned in June last year to better understand the different factors affecting the New Zealand rugby environment in the middle school, comes after 10 schools in Auckland last month who said they would not play St. Kenthner in this year's 1A due to its recruitment policy.

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The students of "St. Petar "are on their side in the final rugby final of Auckland 1A First XV against the Royal College in Eden Park last year.

Phil Walter / GETTY IMAGES

The students of "St. Petar "are on their side in the final rugby final of Auckland 1A First XV against the Royal College in Eden Park last year.

The report was a curse for the first Rugby XV and recruitment practices in some schools.

Several respondents write and talk about how rugby programs in some schools affect negatively their region or their own schools.

"They generally consider talent pooling in several strong rugby schools as a significant factor in reducing the number of players playing because of the effects of, for example, uneven races."

Many respondents in the consultation process feel that it is necessary to achieve a better balance between schools that develop their talents, compared to attracting talented players from other schools, provinces and countries.

He also agreed that more needs to be done to develop basic skills and the holistic development of young men to enable highly talented players to get through and remain in the sport.

"They believe the feeling of self-esteem is too widespread in many of the talented young players they are familiar with."

Future All Black Damian Mackenzie, left, was a pupil at the College of Christ in Christchurch.

KIRK HARGREAVES / STUFF

Future All Black Damian Mackenzie, left, was a pupil at the College of Christ in Christchurch.

The report found that the number of boys playing rugby in New Zealand in high school is moving down with a "worrying speed," given that the overall average has been rising steadily in recent years.

The number of rugby teams among boys and girls in rugby in Auckland has decreased from 225 in 2013 to 188 in 2017 and 181 in 2018. North Harbor had 92 rugby boys for boys and girls in 2014 and 64 in 2018

New Zealand girls' game was experiencing a strong increase in numbers, which sparked separate challenges in terms of resources, coaching and school acceptance.

After a controversial process, the review was conducted by EdSol NZ, an educational consulting company, the main recommendations included:

– Creation of a Rugby Union from New Zealand to develop a vision, values ​​and strategy for rugby in secondary schools
– Permanent Head of NZR in Rugby High School
– Guidance on performance evaluation and performance levels
– Equitable provision of rugby for girls in cooperative schools and adequate funding in schools where girls' rugby is a "new" sport
– Guidelines for provincial alliances and schools on the shape and shape of rugby classes in boys and girls

"There is widespread concern about the impact of recruiting in selected schools, some of which may be unintentional," the report said.

"It is widely believed that players are overly trained, have a sense of right, and are devoid of other sports opportunities.

"Road opportunities for talented schoolchildren are less obvious than in boys' play. Rugby productivity programs in schools must take account of the well-being and holistic development of all participants.

"Parents are recognized as positive participants in rugby programs in schools, but may not be aware of the wider implications of choosing a school for rugby reasons."

Albert Patrick Drumm, a spokesman for the Auckland school colleagues who advocated St Kentigern's recruitment practices at the end of 2018, said he did not want to comment on NZ Rugby's findings, while others investigations continue.

An independent panel is in the process of investigating Saint Kent's complaints about other schools as a result of the dispute last year when 11 schools in Auckland threatened to boycott games involving the private institution in East Auckland about what they think are unacceptable levels of recruitment. ,

More than 500 people participated in online surveys, 300 in focus groups, and those interested in rugby in high schools, participated in consultation meetings, including players' agents and Super Rugby clubs.

All stakeholders agreed that a clear governance structure for the rugby high school was adopted. The current structure is "fragmented and confusing".

Isaiah Mapusua of the Royal College was resolved during the Oakland First XV1A Rugby Finals School against St. Peter's College in Eden Park last year.

Phil Walter / GETTY IMAGES

Isaiah Mapusua of the Royal College was resolved during the Oakland First XV1A Rugby Finals School against St. Peter's College in Eden Park last year.

The report says that "the lack of a comprehensive governing body" is a recurring message received from stakeholders during the review.

It has also been recommended that the NZR establishes a clear definition of which classes are considered to be performance appraisals, all other assessments being recognized as being primarily for maximizing appeal participants and benefits.

NZR Chief Nigel Nigel Nigel Cass admitted that the review is part of NZR's commitment to providing the world's leading rugby system for all its players.

"First of all, we want to make sure that playing rugby is a fun, safe and positive experience for all our teenagers, no matter where they live or at what level they play." Now we understand that some changes will be needed to help us reach this goal and will take time and support from schools, teachers and society. "


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