Thursday , July 29 2021

Electric cars to power the houses as part of the Pichha test in Auckland



Electric vehicles could keep their power during short breaks in Picha this year as part of the vector process.

Cameron Spencer / Getty Images

Electric vehicles could keep their power during short breaks in Picha this year as part of the vector process.

Electric cars will be used to power their homes during power outages as part of a test in West Auckland.

Since only one power cord feeds the western coast, Pichha is chosen as the "ideal" test site by the power company.

This year, the company will examine whether it can take energy from the battery of an electric vehicle (EV) via a home plug to ease the demand for power grids in the peaks and keep power at short-term interruptions.

This would be done by using a portable "home-based" (V2H) unit that can be connected directly to appliances such as refrigerator, computer, TV, internet, lighting, telephone chargers, etc.

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Over a 12-month period, Vector will monitor energy consumption patterns and measure the impact they have on the network.

Pichha municipality on the west coast will be the site of the vector process this year.

Delivered / VECTOR

Pichha municipality on the west coast will be the site of the vector process this year.

Two EV and V2H systems will be delivered to a mix of residents participating in the study during this time.

Andre Bota, the leader of Vector's network, said it was important to understand the impact of the large number of electric vehicles on the power grids.

"As more and more people switch to electric cars, the demand for electricity is likely to increase significantly, especially at peak hours.

"Although we can always build more network infrastructure to meet peak demand, this leads to a high cost for consumers – so more and more companies are turning to new technologies to prepare the network more efficiently for the future, and to provide consumers with more choice. "

Residents participating in the test will also be able to use the home vehicle system as a back-up generator.

"If there is a short-term power outage, the electric vehicle and the home-based vehicle system can be used as a temporary generator for several hours," Bota said.

Power from an electric vehicle is used to boil a teapot using a home car.

Delivered / VECTOR

Power from an electric vehicle is used to boil a teapot using a home car.

Elisa Downey, Vector Communications Manager, said V2H is a "very modern technology" with limited worldwide deployment.

Over more than one year of numerous public events, however, Vector tried to test this technology in New Zealand.

In 2018, two of Nissan Leaf Gen2's electric vehicles and Vector's V2H technology were used to power the Illinois lighting installations at Unitec students at the GLOW Festival at Devonport, which was held as part of Artweek Auckland.

Cars have acted as rechargeable and mobile renewable energy sources during the two days of the festival.

The Piha process is part of the financing of the low-emission government fund.

It is expected to begin in the middle of 2019 and for the first time V2H technology will be shared with private customers.


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