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Kiwi deportation backs off when Winston Peters meets Australian Foreign Minister



Foreign Minister Winston Peters did not express concern about the deportation of New Zealanders from Australia at a meeting with his colleague, although he called the situation "unjustified" since the previous time they gathered.

However, both sides have seen China's eyes on the reprimanding of Uighur Muslims.

Following talks with Australian Foreign Minister Marys Payne in Auckland on Friday, Peters told reporters that there was no time to raise the sharp increase in the number of kiwi deported to the ditch since Australia introduced stricter laws in 2014 year.

"It was not raised this time, because we had a lot to discuss," he said.

But the government has not given up on Australia's pressure on the issue, especially from New Zealand citizens who have lived in Australia for most of their lives, Peters said.

"Of course, we will continue to focus on achieving a much better understanding and what we believe is a much fairer legal outcome, especially when people arrived in Australia when they were 3, 4, 5 , 6 years, 7 years old. "

Concerns about deportation occurred when Payne and Peters met earlier this year, and in February, Prime Minister Jackie Ardenne described the deportation regime as "corrosive" for dealing with the tromstas when she had talks with Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison.

The problem of deportation also emerged when Prime Minister Jacqueline Ardenne and Scott Morrison met this year. Picture / file
The problem of deportation also emerged when Prime Minister Jacqueline Ardenne and Scott Morrison met this year. Picture / file

Paine said her government had no plans to abandon this issue, nor the other kiwi rights in Australia.

Meanwhile, both Payne and Peters met the question of why their countries have joined 20 other countries in signing a letter to the UN Human Rights Council calling on Beijing to end its massive detention of ethnic Uighurs in the Xinjiang region.

"Since we believe in human rights, we believe in freedom and we believe in the freedom of personal convictions and the right to hold them," said Peters.

UN experts believe that at least one million of the Uighur minority group is being held in "re-education" centers in the western region.

The Chinese government described them as training facilities and says it is trying to eliminate "extremism."

Reuters reports that the letter, signed mainly by European states and dated July 8, has not been read and is not presented as a resolution due to fear of China's reaction.

New Zealand has not made a formal announcement of the letter.

Prime Minister Jacqueda Ardern said he has raised human rights with Chinese President Chen Dingpin when he made his first visit to Beijing earlier this year.

This followed calls on her to raise the Uighurs' plight during the visit, especially after the Muslim community's attack in Christchurch on March 15th.

Also, there is a period of speculation that tensions between New Zealand and China have risen after GCSB's decision to block hardware from China's Huawei, a technology giant that is being used in the nationwide 5G Spark telecommunication system.

Peteras and Paine said Friday they are discussing regional security and are facing human rights issues in West Papua. Peters said he raised the issue when he met with Indonesian Foreign Minister Retno Marsudi earlier in the day.

Paine turned to the Cricket World Cup to demonstrate the strength of Antipode's friendship.

"I think this is a good test of how close Australia and New Zealand are, if not challenged, I can go to a conference in Auckland and compliment New Zealand to reach the World Cup finals in my own grief on this question, "she said. ,

Later, Payne added that he would take the black hat shirt and roast for New Zealand on Sunday.

New Zealand's High Commissioner in Australia last year told politicians from across the moat that kiwi were disproportionately affected by the deportation regime because of the crossing with New Zealand's changes in Australian rights introduced in 2001.


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