Sunday , June 20 2021

Hubble's Lost Light gives the deepest look to the universe



Hubble's "Lost Light" gives astronomers the deepest view of the universe they have ever seen

  • Researchers managed to process several images of Hubble
  • Image reprocessing allows them to recover large amounts of light
  • The new image shows that some galaxies were almost twice as large as before

This is the deepest image of the universe ever taken from space.

Astronomers used new techniques to reveal the "lost" light around the largest galaxies in Hubble's ultra-deep images.

Researchers have been able to process several images of Hubble to reveal the new look to our universe.

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Astronomers used new techniques to reveal the "lost" light around the largest galaxies in the famous images of Hubble's ultra-deep field.

Astronomers used new techniques to reveal the "lost" light around the largest galaxies in the famous images of Hubble's ultra-deep field.

Researchers at the Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias have spent three years in image production,

By processing the image and combining multiple images, the group manages to recover a large amount of light from the outer areas of the largest galaxies in the image.

"The restoration of this light emanating from the stars in these outer zones is equivalent to the restoration of light from a complete galaxy," the team said.

For some galaxies, the missing light indicates that they have diameters nearly twice as large as previous measurements.

THE IMAGE OF HUBBLE ULTRA DEEP

HUDF is the result of combining hundreds of images captured with HST's Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) during over 230 hours of surveillance, which in 2012 gives the deepest picture of the universe taken so far.

This view of nearly 10,000 galaxies is called the Ultra Deep Field of Hubble.

This view of nearly 10,000 galaxies is called the Ultra Deep Field of Hubble.

This view of nearly 10,000 galaxies is called the Ultra Deep Field of Hubble.

The photo includes galaxies of different ages, sizes, shapes and colors. The smallest, reddish galaxies, about 100, can be among the farthest known ones existing when the universe was only 800 million years old.

The closest galaxies – the larger, brighter, well-defined spirals and elliptical – flourish about 1 billion years ago when the cosmos is 13 billion years old.

The image requires 800 exposures taken during Hubble's 400 orbits around the Earth.

The total exposure time is 11.3 days taken between 24 September 2003 and 16 January 2004.

"What we did was go back to the archive of the original images directly seen by HST and improve the combination process by striving for the best image quality not only for smaller galaxies, and for the extended ones. Largest galaxies, said Alejandro C. Borlaf, who runs the project.

WFC3, which took the data, was installed by astronauts in May 2009, when Hubble was already in space for 19 years.

The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) is seen in this NASA photo taken on March 9, 2002 with Earth as background.

The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) is seen in this NASA photo taken on March 9, 2002 with Earth as background.

This is a great challenge for researchers since the whole tool (telescope + camera) can not be tested on the ground, making calibration more difficult.

To overcome the problems, they analyzed several thousand images of different regions of the sky in order to improve the calibration of the telescope in orbit.

WHAT IS THE TRAVEL TELESCOPE?

The Hubble Space Telescope was launched on April 24, 1990, via the Space Shuttle Discovery at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

It is named after the famous astronomer Edwin Hubble, who was born in Missouri in 1889.

He is probably best known for discovering that the universe is expanding, and the speed at which it is so – the Hubble constant has now been invented.

Hubble has made more than 1.3 million observations since the start of its mission in 1990 and has helped to publish more than 15,000 scientific papers.

The Hubble Space Telescope is named after Edwin Hubble, who is responsible for the Hubble constant and is one of the greatest astronomers of all time.

The Hubble Space Telescope is named after Edwin Hubble, who is responsible for the Hubble constant and is one of the greatest astronomers of all time.

It travels around the Earth at a speed of about 17,000 mph in a low-Earth orbit at about 340 miles altitude.

Hubble has a precision of 1007 arc seconds, which is like being able to illuminate the laser beam focused on Franklin D. Roosevelt's head about 200 miles away.

Hubble's main mirror has a length of 2.4 meters (7 feet, 10.5 inches) and a total of 13.3 meters (43.5 feet) – the length of a large school bus.

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