Monday , July 26 2021

Latest: 150 Florida people who slipped because of the storm chose via email



FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. – The latest in recounting Florida 2018 elections (all local time):

4:30 a.m.

Election officials in a Florida area hit by Hurricane Michael last month allowed around 150 displaced voters to provide ballots by e-mail, although that was not permitted under state law.

The Miami Herald reported that Bay County Supervisor Election Mark Andersen defended the decision Monday.

Andersen told the newspaper that parts of the county were still turned off by law enforcement, preventing people from reaching their homes. Transferred voters are allowed to scan and send their ballots to the election office. Andersen said all ballots were verified by signature.

Hurricane Michael crashed into the Florida Panhandle on October 10 as a devastating Category 4 storm. On October 18, Governor Rick Scott issued an executive order to expand initial elections and appoint more polling locations in eight districts, including Bay. The statement accompanying the order specifically prohibits the voice from being returned via email or fax.

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2:45 a.m.

Election officials say boxes labeled with "temporary ballots" that appear around Broward County contain office supplies used on Election Day and are not used to collect actual full ballots.

Superintendent Broward of election prosecutor Eugene Pettis said the box contained office supplies and red envelopes for polling stations to be used for each temporary ballot. Temporary ballots are thrown when someone votes without their identification or feasibility cannot be immediately verified by election officials.

Pettis said temporary ballots were sealed in envelopes and sent separately to the election office supervisor. The box was then filled with office supplies and sent to the same office but did not contain ballots.

One box found in elementary school was opened for reporters. It only contains office supplies.

An additional box was found Sunday night behind a rented car returned at Fort Lauderdale airport. A spokesman for the Broward Sheriff's Office, Veda Coleman-Wright, said the deputies sent them back to the right office.

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2:00 pm

Lawyers for Republicans and Democrats and their candidates have agreed to add three deputy sheriffs to monitor the recount of the Florida governor and Senate race at the Broward County election supervisory office.

Chief Judge Circuit Jack Tuter, Monday morning, suggested that the parties agree to suggestions for placing additional law enforcement officers in Brenda Snipes's office, where people's voices were being counted. He said this would be a measure that could help convince citizens that the integrity of Florida's recount was protected.

The judge said he did not see evidence of a vote count in Broward County and urged lawyers on all sides to "tear down rhetoric."

Lawyers for the Senate campaign Gott Rickerson seeks security for ballots and machines. The results of the informal election showed Scott leading the incumbent US Senator Bill Nelson with just 0.14 percentage points.

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1 noon

A spokesman for the Senator campaign from Florida Governor Rick Scott said lawyers for prospective US Congressman Senator Bill Nelson "seemed content to file a reckless and ridiculous lawsuit."

Nelson's campaign sued the Florida State Department on Monday in an attempt to count ballots in ballots that were stamped before Election Day but were not delivered before the vote was closed Tuesday. Attorney Marc Elias said voters should not lose their rights because of delays in sending letters that were not their fault.

The unofficial election results showed Scott leading Nelson with 0.14 percentage points as the countdown continued throughout the state.

Scott's campaign spokesman, Chris Hartline, called the lawsuit "no less than the official white flag of surrender."

Also Monday, a South Florida judge who presided over the emergency session brought by Scott's campaign regarding the security of the ballots during the recount urged lawyers on both sides to "tear down rhetoric."

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noon

A Florida judge said he did not see evidence of a vote count in Broward County and urged all parties to "reduce rhetoric."

Chief Judge Circuit Jack Tuter said during an emergency hearing Monday that there was a need to convince residents that the integrity of Florida's recount was being protected.

For this reason, he urged lawyers for Rick Scott and others representing Republicans and Democrats and their candidates and Broward County election office to approve a number of minor additions to security, including the addition of three law enforcement officers to keep an eye on things.

And the judge said that if there was evidence of fraud or irregularities in the voters, they should report it to law enforcement.

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11:30 a.m.

US Senator Senator Bill Nelson sued the Florida State Department in an attempt to count ballots through ballots that were stamped before Election Day but were not delivered before the vote was closed.

Nelson's lawyer, Marc Elias, filed a lawsuit on Monday, saying voters should not lose their rights because of delays in sending letters that were not their fault. The results of the unofficial election showed Nelson trailing Republican Governor Rick Scott with 0.14 percentage points.

For example, he cited a Miami-Dade County postal facility that was evacuated when explosives sent to prominent Democrats were processed there.

"The acceptance limit for the March 7 Florida reception day for voting via ballot weighs the right to elect eligible voters," the lawsuit said.

Elias wants all ballots to be stamped before November 6 to count if they are received within 10 days of the election.

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10 a.m

Governor Rick Scott wanted law enforcement to confiscate a voice machine and Broward County ballot when they were not used during a recount in Florida.

Lawyers for the Senate Scott campaign asked Circuit Chief Judge Jack Tuter on Monday to provide custody of all voice and ballot machines to the Sheriff Broward Office and the Florida Law Enforcement Department whenever they are not used.

The recount was guaranteed by outside police and deputies inside, with both parties and the campaign monitoring the entire process. After the calibration test is completed on the voting machine, the vote count will continue all the time. So it's not clear when the machine or ballot will be "not used."

Scott said Election Supervisor Brenda Snipes had a history of violating state law during the vote count.

The recount was triggered because Scott led Democratic candidate Bill Nelson with only 0.14 percentage points.

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12:15 a.m.

Mishaps, protests and litigation overshadow the vote counts in the important Florida race for US governors and Senates, given the failure of the president in 2000 in the main political battle states.

All 67 countries face Thursday's deadline to complete the recount. Half began last weekend amid initial drama focused on the districts of Broward and Palm Beach, home to the concentration of large Democratic voters.

The recount was ordered Saturday after unofficial results showed Rep. Former US Republican Ron DeSantis who led Democrat Tallahassee Mayor Andrew Gillum with 0.41 percentage points for the governor. Scott's leadership of Democratic candidate Bill Nelson is 0.14 percentage points for the Senate.

This recount was unprecedented, even in the notoriously bad states of completing elections with razor-sharp margins.

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