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Doctor Miracle Worker performs an innovative operation on an unborn baby with spina bifida



When Sheri Sharpe was still in her mother's womb, a young surgeon saved her life with a pioneering blood transfusion.

Three decades later, they crossed again when the same specialist helped Cherry's son – in her womb – in an operation that had just begun to take place in the United Kingdom.

Professor Kipros Nicolaides, a leading global expert in fetal medicine, offered Miss Sharpe, a 29-year, innovative post-pregnancy scan that her baby has life-threatening spina bifida.

Professor Kipros Nicolaides, a leading global expert in fetal medicine, offered Sherry Sharp, a 29-year-old, post-pregnancy scanning procedure that showed her baby had life-threatening spina bifida

Professor Kipros Nicolaides, a leading global expert in fetal medicine, offered Sherry Sharp, a 29-year-old, post-pregnancy scanning procedure that showed her baby had life-threatening spina bifida

She was 23 weeks pregnant when she was told that her baby had spina bifida, leading to incorrect spinal cord formation. This results in damage to the nerves, which can cause paralysis and brain damage

She was 23 weeks pregnant when she was told that her baby had spina bifida, leading to incorrect spinal cord formation. This results in damage to the nerves, which can cause paralysis and brain damage

Six weeks after surgery, the baby was born. Now he is four weeks old and he can kick his legs and twist around - the movement became possible thanks to surgery. Miss Sharpe of Horsham, West Sussex, said, "He's amazed us all - he's a miracle"

Six weeks after surgery, the baby was born. He is now four weeks old and can kick his legs and twist around – movement has become possible through surgery. Miss Sharpe of Horsham, West Sussex, said, "He's amazed us all – he's a miracle"

Sherry Sharpe (pictured with her newborn last month) underwent a lock operation to restore Jackson's son biceps while he was still in the womb in the first such operation in the UK.

Jackson (pictured) is doing well and is pulling. Without surgery, he could have been stationary

Sheri Sharpe (pictured with her newborn last month) underwent a lock operation to repair Jackson's son bifida while he was still in the womb in the first operation of this type in the UK. Jackson (right) twists his legs. Without surgery, he could have been stationary

Ms. Sharp (pictured with Jaxson) refused to abort when a 20-week scan revealed that his spinal cord was bulging from his back. She chose to run the surgery at 27 weeks

Ms. Sharp (pictured with Jaxson) refused to abort when a 20-week scan revealed that his spinal cord was bulging from his back. She chose to run the surgery at 27 weeks

Heroes call the miracle worker

When parents meet for the first time with Professor Kipros Nicolaides, this is one of the worst days in their lives.

They are often told that their unborn child is likely to die and their only hope is in the hands of the surgeon known as the "miracle worker".

Professor Nicolaides has spent 40 years in the care of the smallest and most vulnerable NHS patients. He runs the world-famous department for fetal medicine at King's College Hospital in London, where his office is decorated with pictures of hundreds of babies whose lives he has saved.

His work revolutionized fetal medicine. The first doctor to perform a laser surgery in the womb specializes in innovative techniques that allow him to diagnose, cure or even prevent certain conditions before the baby is born.

Professor Nikolaidis was born in Cyprus in 1953 and was trained at the Kings College Medical School. He has been a professor of fetal medicine since 1991.

He led a team of doctors who operated it using a lock operation when she was six months pregnant.

Three small incisions were made in Miss Sharp's abdomen and a thin chamber and surgical instruments were placed in her. The doctors then repair the baby's spine during a three-hour surgery at King's College Hospital in London.

Six weeks later, baby Jackson was born. He is now four weeks old and can kick his legs and twist around – movement has become possible through surgery. Miss Sharp of Horsham, West Sussex, said: "He's amazed us – it's a miracle."

She was 23 weeks pregnant when she was told that her baby had spina bifida, leading to incorrect spinal cord formation. This results in damage to the nerves, which can cause paralysis and brain damage.

Miss Sharp had been offered a number of options, including abortion, before her mother, Jacqueline, at age 56, offered to go to Professor Nicolaides. The surgeon saved Miss Sharp's life in 1990 by giving her blood through her mother's umbilical cord when she developed severe anemia in the womb.

66-year-old Professor Nicolaides said, "When Sherry came to see me, she asked me if I remember her. Of course! I remember everything about my mother's job, even 30 years ago.

The procedure is not easy, but it will reduce the risk of Jackson complications

The procedure is not easy, but it will reduce the risk of Jackson complications

Jaxson (pictured) was born 33 weeks ago last month, with his back "healing well"

Jaxson (pictured) was born 33 weeks ago last month, with his back "healing well"

Doctors have repaired spina bifida through a surgical cunt in the mother's uterus in the UK

Doctors have repaired spina bifida through a surgical cunt in the mother's uterus in the UK

HOW CAN YOU USE KEY SICKNESS IN SPINA BIFIDA WOMEN'S MANAGEMENT?

Spinia bifida is a birth defect that causes the baby's spinal cord not to develop properly.

If not treated, it can cause nerve damage, leading to paralysis of the legs, incontinence and fluid build-up in the brain.

Surgery of the lock includes doctors who make a few small incisions in the mother's abdomen.

Then insert a camera and surgical instruments into the womb before placing the baby's spine.

The muscles and skin of the baby should be closed to prevent leakage of the fluid from the spine.

A patch to cover the vertebra is also used.

This is preferable to the post-natal repair surgery, as the complications become heavier as the longer the spinal cord is exposed to the amniotic fluid.

It is also better to make a few small incisions than a large one because of the risk the uterus can tear during a woman's subsequent pregnancy.

"It was a pioneering operation and her mother was one of the first to operate."

He added, "I immediately felt a very close connection with Sherry. It was very nice to see someone I was treating as a fruit that came back to me 30 years later, even though I felt very old.

Sherry said he had to pay me for saving my life by letting me try this new technique. I saved two generations of the family – I do not think I will be in third place! I was so happy when I met Jackson. I felt like my child.

Miss Sharpe, who works at the pharmacy, is the second woman to undergo the operation of the British Spin Lock lock. She said, "I'm only here today, thanks to the Kings specialists, so I wanted my baby to have the same chance.

– There are many foot movements. We were told that there would be minimal movements if we did not have an operation or would not be able to move them at all.

"This is not a complete treatment, but it means that Jackson can do things he would not otherwise do."

Her mother said, "When I met Chiropros during pregnancy in 1990, Sherry was highly anemic and in a critical condition. I had to take my blood, freeze it, clean it and put it back in the umbilical cord. Without him, Sherry had no chance of surviving.

"He helped me through my other pregnancies. Now I have five children and seven grandchildren, thanks to him – he is part of the family.

Kings College Hospital is the first center in the UK to perform surgical interventions of babies with spina bifida while still in the womb.

WHAT IS A POTENTIAL BUDAPEST?

Spina bifida is a defect in the development of the spine and spinal cord, leaving a gap in the spine.

About 1,500 babies are born each year in the United States with spina bifida, according to the CDC. In the UK approximately one in 1,000 babies are born with this condition.

Most cases are detected before birth in a 20-week scan.

The most serious form of the disease is called myelomeningocele. In the myelomeniogue, the spine remains open on the bones of the spine.

The membranes and the spinal cord are pushed to create a bag in the back of the baby.

This sometimes leaves the nervous system vulnerable to infections, which can be fatal.

In most cases, an operation is performed to close the gap in the spine after birth.

But the damage to the nervous system has usually occurred, as a result of which:

Most babies with myelomeniogel will also develop hydrocephalus, with excess cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) collecting in the brain.

This is caused by a malformation at the base of the skull, in which the lower parts of the brain are pushed down to the spinal cord.

Babies with hydrocephalus are provided with post-natal shunt to divert fluid from the brain, thus reducing the risk of cranial pressure increase in the abdominal cavity.


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