Thursday , June 24 2021

UNICEF health workers struggle to eliminate Ebola in the DRC




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In August 2018, children read an Ebola awareness poster in North Kivu, Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC).

In August 2018, children read an Ebola awareness poster in North Kivu, Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC).© UN0228959 / Naftalin

For 70 years, UNICEF has placed children in the first place by working to protect their rights and providing the help and services they need to survive and thrive around the world. & Nbsp;

For Jean-Pierre Masuku, the fight against & nbsp;Ebola epidemic& nbsp; currently in North Kivu, in the east of the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), is not a novelty. He witnessed an earlier epidemic of the disease in the province of Ecuador, 1550 miles west of the newly hit areas. "But whatever it is, you do not get used to fighting a dangerous, contagious and deadly disease like Ebola," he says.

Masuku is a UNICEF employee active in communicating with the community. He went to Benny with UNICEF's first response team only hours after the DRC Health Minister announced the new Ebola outbreak in August 2018. "The first days were not easy. The scale of the crisis is still not clear and the material, human and financial resources for the response are lacking. But UNICEF quickly mobilizes the teams and the necessary means to meet the needs. "Within 10 days of the announcement, more than 20 Ebola cases were confirmed at the two epicenter sites of the epidemic: Benny and the Mangina Health Zone, about 19 miles east of Bennie.

In the fight against disease, UNICEF mobilizes communication specialists to raise awareness among local populations. "As part of my communication activities I visit markets, among other places. With the support of local civil organizations, I remind people that good hygiene and frequent handwashing are essential to prevent the disease. "

Jean-Pierre Masuku, a UNICEF employee in North Kivu, is discussing the prevention of a girl with Ebola in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) at Benny.

Jean-Pierre Masuku, a UNICEF employee in North Kivu, is discussing the prevention of a girl with Ebola in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) at Benny.© UN0228983 / Naphthalene

In the central market of Benny Masuku he repeatedly repeated the messages about the prevention of his megaphone. On his behalf, members of the local civic organization disseminate leaflets on prevention. "I inform people in the market that the government has introduced a free number that they can call to report cases of embo in their community. They should be treated quickly by competent health services to avoid any contamination around them. "While Masuku communicates with the free number, passers-by around him record it on their mobile phones. The population is clearly concerned about the epidemic. Everyone wants to protect themselves, their family and the community from deadly disease.

Masuku and his colleagues are not making efforts to create a shield by informed people to prevent the spread of the disease. "In the communication committee that UNICEF is working with the government, we identify all partners that can help us understand the local population. All ideas are welcome. They are discussed at our daily meeting. "

The job is definitely not over. We still have a lot of people to understand. In Mangina, Ebola's other epicenter, Masuku's colleagues are developing similar activities. With partners, UNICEF teaches dozens of local health workers. They go from door to door to educate every family in affected communities. Local radio stations and journalists broadcast preventive messages to their listeners and readers.

A member of the UNICEF Ebola Promotion Team is addressing children in Benin in northern Kivu in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

A member of the UNICEF Ebola Promotion Team is addressing children in Benin in northern Kivu in the Democratic Republic of Congo.© UN0228983 / Naphthalene

Only a week after the outbreak, UNICER and its partners have already reached more than 30,000 people with their preventive work. "Each of them is a partner in the fight against the Ebola virus. They can forward preventive messages to their families and neighbors, "Masuku said. "Work is definitely not over. We still have a lot of people to feel sensitivity at Benny and Mangin, "he concludes.

There is a big smile on Masuku's face when I ask him how to fight the Ebola virus in North Kivu: "I am proud to help eliminate the disease on my side. And I am pleased to be able to do this within UNICEF as our organization plays a decisive role in the fight against the Ebola virus. "

Since the beginning of the last outbreak of the Ebola, more than 740 people – one-third of them – have been infected with the Ebola virus and over 460 have died. UNICEF is working with the DRC government and partners to increase the scale of its response to help victims, control the spread of the disease and end the deadly epidemic. To date, UNICEF and its partners are:

  • Reach more than 10 million people in the affected areas with warning messages
  • Clean, safe drinking water is provided for more than 1.3 million people in public places, health care facilities and schools
  • 8146 teachers were trained on ebola prevention measures
  • It has reached 157,133 children in 888 schools with preventive measures
  • Assistance was provided to 830 families directly affected by Ebola
  • 686 & nbsp;Orphan of Ebola& nbsp; and provided them with proper care

Please support UNICEF's work to eliminate Ebola in the Democratic Republic of Congo. & Nbsp;

PROTECTION OF CHILDREN& Nbsp;

UNICEF and partners are working tirelessly in the Democratic Republic of Congo, Syria, Yemen, South Sudan, Bangladesh and around the world to save and protect children. With presence in 190 countries and territories, UNICEF has helped save more lives for children than any other humanitarian organization in the world. & Nbsp;

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In August 2018, children read an Ebola awareness poster in North Kivu, Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC).

In August 2018, children read an Ebola awareness poster in North Kivu, Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC).© UN0228959 / Naftalin

For more than 70 years, UNICEF has placed children in the first place by working to protect their rights and providing the help and services they need to survive and thrive around the world.

For Jean-Pierre Masuku, the fight against the Ebola epidemic, which is currently growing in North Kivu, in the eastern DRC, is not new. He witnessed an earlier epidemic of the disease in the province of Ecuador, 1550 miles west of the newly hit areas. "But whatever it is, you do not get used to fighting a dangerous, contagious and deadly disease like Ebola," he says.

Masuku is a UNICEF employee active in communicating with the community. He went to Benny with UNICEF's first response team only hours after the DRC Health Minister announced the new Ebola outbreak in August 2018. "The first days were not easy. The scale of the crisis is still not clear and the material, human and financial resources for the response are lacking. But UNICEF quickly mobilizes the teams and the necessary means to meet the needs. "Within 10 days of the announcement, more than 20 Ebola cases were confirmed at the two epicenter sites of the epidemic: Benny and the Mangina Health Zone, about 19 miles east of Bennie.

In the fight against disease, UNICEF mobilizes communication specialists to raise awareness among local populations. "As part of my communication activities I visit markets, among other places. With the support of local civil organizations, I remind people that good hygiene and frequent handwashing are essential to prevent the disease. "

Jean-Pierre Masuku, a UNICEF employee in North Kivu, is discussing the prevention of a girl with Ebola in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) at Benny.

Jean-Pierre Masuku, a UNICEF employee in North Kivu, is discussing the prevention of a girl with Ebola in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) at Benny.© UN0228983 / Naphthalene

In the central market of Benny Masuku he repeatedly repeated the messages about the prevention of his megaphone. On his behalf, members of the local civic organization disseminate leaflets on prevention. "I inform people in the market that the government has introduced a free number that they can call to report cases of embo in their community. They should be treated quickly by competent health services to avoid any contamination around them. "While Masuku communicates with the free number, passers-by around him record it on their mobile phones. The population is clearly concerned about the epidemic. Everyone wants to protect themselves, their family and the community from deadly disease.

Masuku and his colleagues are not making efforts to create a shield by informed people to prevent the spread of the disease. "In the communication committee that UNICEF is working with the government, we identify all partners that can help us understand the local population. All ideas are welcome. They are discussed at our daily meeting. "

The job is definitely not over. We still have a lot of people to understand. In Mangina, Ebola's other epicenter, Masuku's colleagues are developing similar activities. With partners, UNICEF teaches dozens of local health workers. They go from door to door to educate every family in affected communities. Local radio stations and journalists broadcast preventive messages to their listeners and readers.

A member of the UNICEF Ebola Promotion Team is addressing children in Benin in northern Kivu in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

A member of the UNICEF Ebola Promotion Team is addressing children in Benin in northern Kivu in the Democratic Republic of Congo.© UN0228983 / Naphthalene

Only a week after the outbreak, UNICER and its partners have already reached more than 30,000 people with their preventive work. "Each of them is a partner in the fight against the Ebola virus. They can forward preventive messages to their families and neighbors, "Masuku said. "Work is definitely not over. We still have a lot of people to feel sensitivity at Benny and Mangin, "he concludes.

There is a big smile on Masuku's face when I ask him how to fight the Ebola virus in North Kivu: "I am proud to help eliminate the disease on my side. And I am pleased to be able to do this within UNICEF as our organization plays a decisive role in the fight against the Ebola virus. "

Since the beginning of the last outbreak of the Ebola, more than 740 people – one-third of them – have been infected with the Ebola virus and over 460 have died. UNICEF is working with the DRC government and partners to increase the scale of its response to help victims, control the spread of the disease and end the deadly epidemic. To date, UNICEF and its partners are:

  • Reach more than 10 million people in the affected areas with warning messages
  • Clean, safe drinking water is provided for more than 1.3 million people in public places, health care facilities and schools
  • 8146 teachers were trained on ebola prevention measures
  • It has reached 157,133 children in 888 schools with preventive measures
  • Assistance was provided to 830 families directly affected by Ebola
  • 686 Ebola orphans have been identified and given appropriate care

Please support UNICEF's work to eliminate Ebola in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

PROTECTION OF CHILDREN

UNICEF and partners are working tirelessly in the Democratic Republic of Congo, Syria, Yemen, South Sudan, Bangladesh and around the world to save and protect children. With presence in 190 countries and territories, UNICEF has helped save more lives for children than any other humanitarian organization in the world.


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